Policy

Policy Priorities

Local Priorities

LaFHAC promotes inclusive city planning, policies and procedures to ensure fair housing choice,  advance zoning based on equitable access and opportunity, and increase the amount of housing stock accessible to all people, regardless of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability, familial status, marital status, sexual orientation, or gender identity or expression.

State Priorities

LaFHAC works at the Louisiana State Legislature and with state government agencies to enforce state housing laws, pass new protections, and increase the amount of housing stock for all people, regardless of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability, familial status, marital status, sexual orientation, or gender identity or expression.

U.S. Federal Priorities

LaFHAC supports federal efforts to promote fair lending, increase the nation’s available housing stock, augment enforcement capacity by fair housing centers nationwide, and advance robust laws and regulations that promote access to housing for all people, regardless of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability, familial status, marital status, sexual orientation, or gender identity or expression.

Recent Policy Victories

Security Deposit Reform

In 2018, the Louisiana Legislature passed a new law that raises the penalty for landlords who keep security deposits without good reason. The law increases the amount a tenant can receive if they win their case to three times the amount of the stolen deposit.​​​​​​

The Louisiana Violence Against Women Act

This Louisiana law, passed in 2015, protects survivors of domestic violence from housing discrimination. The four main provisions are:

1) Anyone in need of emergency assistance can contact police without penalty.

Why it’s important:  Lease agreements often mention that a single police visit is grounds for eviction.  No one should hesitate to call emergency assistance when they need it.

2) Survivors can no longer be evicted because of the violence of their abuser.

Why it’s important:  Surveys of women living in domestic violence shelters found that 1 in 3 survivors were in the shelter because they lost their housing due to the violence of an abuser. In Orleans and Jefferson parishes, that number was above 50%.

3) Survivors can no longer be denied housing solely on the basis of past abuse.

Why it’s important:  Survivors report that when a domestic violence shelter is the last known address, they have trouble securing housing.

4) Survivors can now terminate a lease early and move if they need to.

Why it’s important:  Survivors seeking to flee an abuser can leave when they need to, without forfeiting a deposit or otherwise being penalized for a move necessary to ensure their safety.